Presentations 
 
Keynote
12:30-1:20
How to Milk a MOOC
Catheryn Cheal, San Jose State University
From the invention of writing to the construction of massive open online courses, MOOCs' innovative technology for teaching have fostered old fears while offering us new solutions. San Jose State University began building MOOCs with Udacity for credit in 2012 to accommodate more students in more online course sections at less cost . The resulting media publicity focused a spotlight on the hope of reaching more students through open education and worries about faculty jobs and the quality of the pedagogy. Cathy Cheal, as Associate Vice President of Academic Technology, managed faculty development and the business process change for the MOOC project and as a result had a front seat at the center of the storm. 

Presentation File (.pptx)
 
Track 1-Gold Rooms
9:00-9:50 
An iPad Semester Loan Program: Management, Policy and Pedogogical Value of iPads 
Terri Gustafson, Michigan State University 

During the 2012-13 and 2013-14 academic years, the College of Education at Michigan State University sponsored an iPad Semester Loan Program for individual classes across three disciplines. During this presentation, I will discuss the outcomes of the program for undergraduate and graduate level courses in teacher education, kinesiology and counseling/educational psychology. Four of the six classes that participated included a fieldwork component and the fifth course included a clinical setting for athletic trainers. The application process, distribution, and management of 100-plus iPads over four semesters will be demonstrated. In addition, the results of student surveys administered both pre and post semesters will be shared. This topic is relevant to higher education from a mobile device management perspective. Also, the pedagogical implications are important for faculty and academic specialists that wish to incorporate mobile devices into their coursework. The financial implications of purchasing and managing mobile devices and the policies implemented concerning app installations, purchases, and ownership will also be discussed.

Presentation File (.pptx)

10:00-10:50
Changing Culture through Online Faculty Certification
Sharon Giffen and Carl Weckerle, Macomb Community College
Macomb Community College has re-designed its online certification program to meet the diverse and changing and needs of over 1,300 faculty. This presentation describes how the changing landscape and competitive learning management systems challenge an institution’s ability to ensure that high quality online courses are consistently developed. We will share the overall process, our lessons learned, keys to success, and feedback from faculty who have recently completed the re-designed online instructor certification process.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)

11:00-11:50 
Ensuring Academic Integrity with Online Proctoring
Erik Cederholm, ProctorU
The presentation will demonstrate how educators can prevent cheating, ensure the academic integrity of distance learning programs, and advance policies designed to reduce incidents of dishonesty online using a number of strategies. The presenter will also share industry research and best practices.

1:30-2:20 
What is So Hard About Teaching Online?
Linda Foran, Eastern Michigan University
The increasing demand for online classes in higher education is forcing a paradigm shift in how professors share their knowledge base with their students. Participation in an online class is now a reality for many graduate-level students. Furthermore, after completing their programs, opportunities for these graduates to teach higher education online classes are growing exponentially. The goal of this presentation is to introduce research and pedagogical best practices to be considered when designing an online course. The presentation begins with a demonstration of the “wrong” approach for designing an online class by demonstrating pedagogy that refutes current best practices. This interactive presentation introduces and/or reinforces appropriate and effective course design.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)
 
2:30-3:20 
Evaluating the Quality of Online Programs
Diane Cairns, Lawrence Technological University
This presentation will provide an overview of the tools available to measure the quality of online material, courses, and programs. Online course and program quality impacts student retention, enrollment and graduation rates. Lawrence Technological University is advancing in the subscription of the Sloan Consortium Quality Scorecard. This presentation will share the journey, purpose, and strategic decision to subscribe to a method for oversight of quality online programs. Attendees will learn about quality rubrics available for measuring online course material and the Sloan-C Quality Scorecard.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)

Track 2-Lake Michigan Room
9:00-9:50
Utilizing Modern Technology in the Classroom
Chris Kobus, Oakland University
Technological advances have come a long way in helping instructors teach more effectively, whether in a conventional setting, a flipped/hybrid, or through online delivery. This talk will focus on these technologies, both from the hardware and software sides. Best practices in utilizing technology and  how to get faculty motivated when they are not familiar with it will also be discussed.

10:00-10:50 
Moving Pictures: Using Video in Courses 
Fritz McDonald and Grant Yocom, Oakland University
This presentation will discuss the use of video in online and in-person classes. We will discuss the technology used to prepare and post the videos on YouTube,  as well as, the advantages and issues that present themselves in the preparation of these videos for incorporation into online classes. We will also discuss the use of Cisco WebEx to run live, interactive video presentations.  We will show how to incorporate materials from a variety of applications into these live online discussions. We will also discuss how to involve students through recorded and live video, address the pedagogical benefits and challenges of these differing methods of deployment for educational video content and consider the advantages and disadvantages of the use of video technology both generally, and particularly as it compares to the kind of interaction involved in the traditional in-person classroom.

McDonald Presentation File (.pptx)

Yocom Presentation File (.pptx)
 
11:00-11:50  
Vicarious Learning Theory Applied: Using GoAnimate to Develop Online Instructional Vignettes
William Solomonson, Oakland University 
In this presentation, the author will review current trends in cognitive learning research as they impact the online instructional setting. One of the theories underpinning this research is vicarious learning theory. Also called "learning by observing", this approach has deep roots in modern instructional research and practice (e.g. Bandura, 1962). Recent research has explored this approach in terms of different kinds of learning situations such as problem-solving, tutor/tutee, and more (Craig et al. 2000; Craig, et al. 2006; Driscoll et al. 2003), but how does this method impact online instruction? The author will present an overview of the topic, review current research, and conclude with a live demonstration/tutorial using a cloud-based animation tool (GoAnimate) to create an engaging and effective instructional vignette.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)
 
1:30-2:20  
Green Screen at Your Fingertips: Immersing Yourself in Your Content
Brandon Blinkenberg, Carson Waites and Andrea Becker, University of Michigan-Flint
It has never been easier to create immersive and fun videos that can place you directly in the context of a lecture, establishing deeper connections between the speaker, the viewer, and the subject at hand. The latest version of the popular screen recorder, Camtasia includes a new “Remove a Color” tool. This small addition allows you to remove a background and superimpose yourself into the location of your choosing. Tools required include a webcam (or other video device), a collapsible green screen, and Camtasia for PC.  In this demonstration session we will ask a volunteer to step in front of our small green screen. We will then transport them to the location of their choosing in about 10 mouse clicks. A handout with the necessary steps will be provided.

2:30-3:20  
Teaching with Technology, Starting with the 'Teachers'
Amanda Nichols Hess, Oakland University
Increasingly, faculty members and college instructors are expected to meaningfully integrate technology into their instructional practices. But, how can competencies and comfort levels be built up so they can teach with technology in thoughtful, effective ways?  This presentation will examine how an informal learning community engaged library faculty members in thinking about, and using, technology in instructionally meaningful ways to develop online learning opportunities for students. With Booth’s (2011) USER instructional design model serving as its pedagogical structure, this faculty cohort worked through the course of the 2013-2014 school year to develop targeted and specific online learning objects to respond to a range of learning needs. This presentation will share the scholarship behind the creation of the informal learning community as well as the design process used to develop and deploy it throughout the academic year. Throughout the discussion of the faculty learning community, learning artifacts (including documents, prototypes, and “final” products) will be shared to demonstrate how this instructional community was pedagogically effective in encouraging faculty to think about teaching with technology in rich and authentic ways. Implications from this community’s practices will be discussed, and future directions for research and implementation will be identified.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)

Track 3-Room 128-130
9:00-9:50 
What Google Apps Show Us About the Present and Future of Online Collaboration 
Christina Moore, Oakland University
Even if we didn’t willfully use Google Apps to organize our individual and collaborative work, it is likely that we have been compelled to do so by others to develop proposals, organize meeting times, and collect data. Why do so many of us use them? Do we expect to use Google products for the same purposes in the years to come? These questions lead us to define the future of online collaboration in academics and the workplace. With this insight, we should prepare our students for the online collaborative environment their professional lives will likely entail? This presentation will focus on the advantages of facilitating teamwork through Google Applications such as Docs, Sheets, Presentations, Forms, Sites, and Calendar, both for learning outcomes related to the course content and the transfer of the course’s skills to contexts beyond the classroom. This presentation will review research on the nature of online collaboration in the 21st century workplace, how it has changed the way we work, and why Google will likely be a part of our workplace structures for years to come.
 
Presentation Link 

10:00-10:50 
How Wearable Technology Will Impact Our Classrooms 
Julie Alspach, Oakland Schools ISD
New forms of technology such as Google Glass will certainly impact teaching. Come see a demonstration of Google Glass and learn the hardware and user interface from a Google Glass Explorer. Join the discussion about how this and other wearable technology can be used in a classroom at any level and how it will impact instruction.

Presentation File (.pptx)
 
11:00-11:50  
How to Make Your Online ESL Courses Come Alive! 
Marija Franetovic and Nawal Abbas, Lawrence Technological University
Online courses can be challenging to develop and teach, this is especially true for ESL courses. Special considerations have to be made from the beginning to ensure everyone is on board successfully and is engaged in learning activities. Activities with tools such as Voice Board and Skype enable practice and assessment of reading and conversation. Similarly, grammar quizzes, the Discussion Board, and progressive essay assignments are used for writing. An accompanying ‘0’ credit course, which uses off-the-shelf Reading Horizons software, also provides ESL practice. The Reading Horizons multi-sensory delivery method helps activate several areas of the brain and because of this the instruction has been effective for English language learners. The benefits include many different embedded exercises such as self-checking pronunciation animations. Challenges include the reassignment of limited licenses and assessment that is not integrated with the learning management system. In the socio-technical online environment, ESL students may start off with a communication barrier and then technology can be an additional barrier. However, ESL students benefit from taking online courses where the technology can also work to bring out the shy students as well as prepare them for future online courses and the virtual workplace.

Presentation File (.pptx)
 
1:30-2:20 
Increasing Student Engagement and Interaction Through Personalized Custom Media
Chris Richards and Chris Shaltry, Lansing Community College
Lansing Community College's (LCC), eLearning Department is working with academic program areas and Faculty to produce personalized, custom media to help support next generation learning environments and drive successful student outcomes in courses. By providing access to tools and support, Faculty are being empowered to develop and integrate new technologies through tailored lessons for their academic discipline area. In this presentation technology tools, resources, and practices will be demonstrated that LCC Faculty are using to create effective media driven courses and how students’ needs are being met for today’s social media and interactive, engaging learning environments. Personalized Custom Media such as converting power points into mobile-friendly narrated video with interactive features, customizing screen capture video for software demonstrations, recording high definition video through smart phones and tablets, analyzing low cost peripherals to take productions to the next level, identifying resources to help Faculty distribute and share content with students and identifying best practices for planning, creating, and sharing media with students will be discussed.

2:30-3:20  
Infuse Student Engagement and Assessment Using InfuseLearning
Andrew Steinman, Kent Intermediate School District
InfuseLearning is a free student response tool, which is accessible on any device with a web browser. Unlike clickers, which only allow teachers to ask multiple choice questions, InfuseLearning has 7 question types that can be used with formative assessments. It also includes unique quizzing and student engagement features. In this session, you will learn how to use the features with InfuseLearning and how to use it in your classroom. By the end of this session, you will know how engage and assess students through a variety of ways using InfuseLearning.
 
Presentation Link