Presentations

Keynote Speaker

1:00-1:50
The Benefits of Mobile Technologies: Transformative and Inevitable! Enabling New Pedagogical Practices and Dramatic Increases in Student Performance.
Elliot Soloway, University of Michigan
By 2015, each and every student in America’s K-12 classrooms will be using his or her own mobile computing device 24/7 for curricular purposes. For good reasons! Those miraculously-thin and light, aluminum-encased slabs of glass afford significant benefits for teaching and learning.  For example, Internet-connected, mobile devices enable learners to directly and immediately access information, events, organizations, places, individuals, data, tools, etc., etc. Such unprecedented access enables learners to take control of their own learning – thereby enabling all teachers, not just artisan teachers, to enact a learn-by-doing, inquiry-directed pedagogy in their classrooms. Flipping the classroom is only the beginning; mobile technologies extend the classroom to enable all-the-time, everywhere learning, which, in turn, supports the linking of the abstract ideas explored inside the classroom to the concrete, real world of people, places, and things outside the classroom. The benefits of mobile devices can – and will – enable the next wave of educational practices and unleash dramatic increases in student performance. And, most importantly make no mistake: THIS CHANGE IS INEVITABLE.

Presentation File (.pptx)

Track 1-Effective Teaching with Technology

9:00-9:50
Increased Engagement for Students through Small Group & Individual Face-to-Face Time Blended with Online Activities
Ben Bennett-Carpenter, Oakland University
Of the many possible benefits that online activities may provide students, one that is sometimes overlooked is the possibility for increased engagement for students through small group and individual face-to-face time in a partially online course. Among the many opportunities afforded by online learning spaces is the reorganization of the in-class face-to-face time. By moving some course activities online that would normally be conducted in class in a more traditional format, an instructor can create specialized, focused time periods to work with small groups and individuals more directly on their projects. Examples provided in this presentation will include a first year writing course, a senior year undergraduate interdisciplinary capstone course, and an Honors College course. This more focused, direct work with students on their projects may often prove to be a fast track to specific course objectives and learning outcomes.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)

10:00-10:50
Students as Avatars: Pedagogy and Psychology
William Solomonson, Oakland University
In this presentation, the author will outline to participants pedagogical as well as psychological considerations in applying a synchronous virtual world environment to an on-line course. In this type of environment students and instructors participate as avatars in a 3D world (OpenSimulator).This presentation will provide examples of a graduate-level seminar course where this 3D virtual world technology was used in innovative ways over multiple semesters. Specific pedagogical methods used to increase the quality of learning in a virtual 3D environment will be demonstrated (e.g. guided discussions, case studies, review of student work by students, captured chat logs, etc.). Psychological theory around student engagement and learning using virtual world technologies will be described. The effect of using a virtual 3D environment as a stand-alone course solution, or as part of a blended learning strategy will be explored. The research around how a synchronous environment can improve online course quality through learning outcomes and student engagement, as well as, the steps that are necessary to implement a 3D virtual world using Open Source software (OpenSimulator.org) will be reviewed.
 
Presentation Handout (.pdf)

11:00-11:50
The Other Side of the Screen: Presence
Phyllis White, Oakland University
In an online course, the simplest definition of presence refers to a student's sense of being in and belonging in a course and the ability to interact with other students and an instructor although physical contact is not available.   This session looks at the role of presence through the lens of two asynchronous general education courses and the experience of creating and disseminating curricula of high quality that students can embrace and educators can sustain.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)

2:00-2:50
Teaching with Twitter: Learning a New Literacy
Deborah Van Duinen, Jencen Smith and Brady Van Malsen, Hope College
This presentation will focus on using Twitter as a learning resource in a traditional undergraduate course. In the presentation, one of my students and I will share how we experimented with Twitter in a teacher education class and what, together, we learned about pedagogy, audience, texts, and literacy. What began a small assignment intended for students to learn a new literacy turned out to be a central component of the course that reframed discussions, readings and student learning. This session is designed for people who are thinking about including Twitter in their courses but who don’t yet feel literate in their own Twitter use and/or who aren’t sure how or why to use Twitter with their students. We will offer practical suggestions and strategies for incorporating Twitter into a course and will discuss various educational purposes and outcomes, from general communication to the creation of a different learning space, that can be achieved by using Twitter in the classroom.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)
Presentation Handout (.pdf)
 
3:00-3:50
Hands On, Minds On: Using Technology to Increase Student Engagement in an Online MA Class
Erica Hamilton, Michigan State University
This presentation will focus on various online tools used in a fully online MA course focused on integrating technology in K-12 classrooms. These online tools are embedded in this course as a means of increasing MA students’ engagement and learning, promoting hands on, minds on learning opportunities. Based on research and effective, pedagogically sound strategies used to teach online classes, this presentation offers tips on how to enrich one’s teaching and students’ learning in online classes. In addition to focusing on learning about, playing with, and applying technology in online environments, this presentation will also include discussion and demonstration of tools such as Vodcasts, Padlet, Glogster EDU, Wikis, TED Ed, Today’s Meet, Google Forms, Join Me, Skype, Google Hangouts, VoiceThread, Twitter, and much, much more. This session is designed with interactive opportunities in which participants learn about tools they can use to in their own online (and face to face) courses to foster engagement, increase connection and dialogue, and promote learning.
 
Presentation File (.pptx)
Presentation Handout (.pdf)

Track 2-Quality Conversion to Online
9:00-9:50
The MAGIC of Web Tutorials: Developing Best Practices to (Re)Focus on Users
Amanda Nichols Hess, Oakland University
Diverse instructional content is moving online in the rush to "flip" the classroom. But, what are the best practices in this area? What works, and what doesn't? What can faculty, instructors, librarians, and instructional designers do to make online information appealing, engaging, and useful enough that students will take advantage of it? The Oakland University Library considered these questions and undertook a project to (re)assess how to leverage the library’s social and technology resources to make online tutorials more focused on students' and faculty's needs. Through a multi-part assessment process, the eLearning and Instructional Technology Librarian reconsidered the web tutorials offerings through faculty and staff feedback, a literature review of best practices, and an analysis of other universities' online tutorial offerings. Through this information, the MAGIC guidelines (Manageable, Accessible, Geared at users, Informative, Customizable) were developed for restructuring online tutorials to put users at the center. Employing MAGIC meant integrating web tutorials at points-of-need, identifying and sharing essential information, and engaging students in the learning whenever possible. Library faculty evaluation at the beginning and end of this process support the effectiveness of MAGIC in improving online tutorials!
 
Presentation File (.pptx)
 
10:00-10:50  
From Web 2.0 to Learning 2.0: Back to the Future
Theodora Williams, Marygrove College
According to Rosebrough and Leverette, learners of today are more connected than ever, but have tendencies to be disconnected learners educationally, culturally, and emotionally. A proven method to overcome this challenge is the use of technology. Web 2.0 and other technological innovations offer viable ways of meeting these challenges and engaging the learner. Today's students present a dilemma because of their diversity -- digital natives or digital immigrants, traditional or non-traditional students – all with varied learning styles. Along with this diversity, students have increased expectations. In response to meeting these expectations, alternative methods have evolved, moving from the “sage on the stage” to the “guide on the side” model. This shift requires increased communication between instructor and students to engage students and support learning. Robert Gagne’s nine events of learning provide a framework for thinking about how best to accomplish this. Using tenets of this framework, we converted one of our graduate programs from a traditional on-ground program to a totally on-line program. This initiative caused us to rethink our curriculum and how best to present course content using various technology tools as a means to an end.

Presentation File (.pptx)
 
11:00-11:50 
Paving the Road to Retention: Quality Support Services for Online Students
Maria Franetovic, Lawrence Technological University 
Though online programs at Lawrence Technological University differ in their disciplines, learning activities, and instructor styles, their instructional design is largely based on Sloan Consortium’s five pillars toward quality. This presentation addresses aspects of pillar #2 ”Student Satisfaction” and pillar #5 “Access”. It focuses on student support services and associated technologies. The presenter will describe the current services and resources of a university that was ranked #1 by U.S. News World report for student engagement in undergraduate education. The following are some online student support services which will be discussed from a Course Developer perspective in terms of how they had to adjust to serve the growing population of online students: the Library, the Academic Achievement Center, the ESL program, technical support, Research Support Services, and eLearning Services. The session will end with a participatory activity where the audience will be asked to suggest: “What else may be done to support online students in both the said university and their own universities? And, what may be different ways of assessing quality for Student Support Services?”

Presentation File (.pdf)
 
2:00-2:50
Going Where the Students Are: Using Facebook to Enhance and Increase Student Participation
Emily Brozovic and Maureen McDonough, Michigan State University
Discussion boards can feel outdated and boring to today’s students, so why aren’t we using the communication tools that they’re interacting with on a daily, and sometimes hourly, basis? As a forestry class began to move from a face-to-face session into a completely online format, this was the perfect time to experiment with a different set of tools. Utilizing Facebook groups, online assignments and discussions have expanded the face-to-face classroom by providing a more engaging online learning space. Come and learn how you can get started with your own group as well as hear more specific instances of how we increased participation just by using the tools students are already using.

Presentation File (.pdf)
 
3:00-3:50
Online Master Course Shell: A Model for Developing and Managing Course Content
Diane Ruiz Cairns, Lawrence Technological University
Lawrence Technological University developed a Master Course Shell methodology to improve online course quality and effective management of resources. The methodology integrates the facilitation of instructional design, faculty as subject matter experts, and technology in the production of quality online courses. Incorporating core subject content and program specific requirements is an important element of the design. A solution for managing the increasing demand of online programs and reduction of time spent reconfiguring course content each semester was required. The new methodology allowed for growth in online programs without increasing instructional designer resources. This presentation will demonstrate how the core content is managed within our LMS for online courses and the benefits of effectively supporting, sharing and reusing course objects and artifacts. This presentation will be of interest to instructional designers, faculty and administrators.

Presentation File (.pptx)
 
Track 3-Mobile Technology
9:00-9:50
MadPad in the Elementary Music Classroom
Deborah Blair, Oakland University and Vivian Ellsworth, Eagle Creek Academy
As a university professor in music teacher education, I entered a local school to observe young learners as they used iPads as a tool for critical thinking and creative music performance and composition. The classroom teacher, Vivian Ellsworth, and I will demonstrate MadPad, the app that was used for a series of music lessons. We will share the experiences of fourth grade music students as they worked with MadPad to create soundscapes, arrangements of known songs, and to collaboratively create new musical compositions. Session participants will have time to explore this app and the students’ MadPads. The app: http://www.smule.com/madpad

Presentation File (.pptx)
 
10:00-10:50 
OUWB Student Laptop Program
Robert McAuley, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
The OUWB School of Medicine provides every incoming M1 student with an Apple Macbook Pro. The purpose of this presentation is to review the motivation that drove this initiative and the software and hardware provided. I will also review the cost of the program, support requirements, student feedback, challenges encountered, and future directions.

Presentation File (.pptx)
 
11:00-11:50
Using Softchalk to Present - Avoiding Death by Power Point 
Kathleen Doyle, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine
Using an interactive e-learning module is a great alternative to presenting in Power Point!  Softchalk, a content authoring tool, is a software application that can help authors, writers, instructional designers, faculty and artists create e-learning modules. This presentation will demonstrate how you can effectively integrate technology into content authoring software (using Softchalk) to enhance your Face-2-Face lectures, enhance your online lecture content, and improve the quality and the appeal of your course.  A pre-reading module can be accessed by a participant prior to attending the presentation at this link, https://files.oakland.edu/users/doyle234/Pre-Reading/index.html (Do not use Chrome to view this module). The information within the pre-reading material will be used during the presentation by exploring Active Learning Techniques.  The module can be viewed on a laptop or mobile device with Flash capability.

Presentation Link
 
2:00-2:50
How is Student Engagement Altered in Courses that Encourage Laptop Use?
Jason Aubrey, LectureTools
The large lecture hall may be an efficient way to use instructors to present content to a large population of students but few would argue that this is the best pedagogical design for learning. This talk describes the use of technology to deconstruct a large introductory science class at the University of Michigan into a mix of simultaneous face-to-face, synchronous remote and asynchronous remote participation. The goal of this exercise was to study how the environment the student chose affected their level of engagement, attentiveness and learning. Student surveys showed first that the use of laptops in class was viewed as increasing their engagement. Somewhat surprisingly the students’ engagement was similar regardless whether the student physically came to class or participated synchronously from remote location. The conclusion reached was that if we can provide tools that empower students to actively participate in class they will and they will be more engaged.
Participants are encouraged to bring a laptop or mobile devices to class to participate in this presentation.

3:00-3:50
An Overview of Learning, Scheduling, and Anti-Procrastination Apps and Software for Students and Professors
Barbara Oakley and Chris Kobus, Oakland University
“Smart phones” and tablet PCs are revolutionizing students’ ability to grab any data they want virtually instantaneously. A raft of learning apps is arising to help students to take advantage of these capabilities. Anki flashcards, for example, provide a “smart” way of learning through spaced repetition. Evernote, Studyblue, and other apps provide their own advantages and disadvantages for flashcards and notes. Still other apps, such as Jorte and 30/30, can help with students particular scheduling needs. PC programs such as Action Enforcer can serve as powerful time schedulers, even as other programs can temporarily block access to the internet to help a student keep his or her focus on studies. This presentation provides information about some of the latest in technological study aids for students—and their professors! 
 
Presentation File (.pptx)