Presentations

Keynote
1:00-1:50
The Democratization of Creative Tools
Mike Pegg, Google
Not long ago image and video editing, creating music or building an app for a smartphone required significant financial and computing resources, weeks or years of instructional training or a personal connection to a skilled programmer.  A democratization of creative tools is upon us, making it easier for all of us to access and use them. Complex creative implementations are now possible by more people which is enhancing, encouraging and fostering the creative expression for many more people the world over. Mike will offer his view on the factors driving this revolution and discuss the new opportunities it presents for all of us.

 
Technology that Enables Creativity I (Lime)
9:00-9:50
Teaching Lean in Second Life
Shannon Flumerfelt, Oakland University and Nic Bongers, Oakland University
For this presentation, we will describe and demonstrate two Second Life learning activities, the Push/Pull Factory simulation and the Lean Poker game. Some of the pedagogical issues of project-based learning for adults will be explained. We will also share some preliminary pilot testing data on these two simulations and describe any improvements in teaching methodology and activity design added as improvements. We will also explain how these Second Life Games will be used in the future for lean instruction and training.

Presentation File (.ppt)


10:00-10:50
Thinking-In-Music-With-Music
Phyllis White, Oakland University
OU's online music general education courses––MUS 339, What’s On Your Playlist? Aesthetic Experiences in Music, and MUS 225, Song and Songwriting––explore thinking-in-music-with-music through original and digitally edited musical clips. In so doing, students are uniquely poised to bring both verbal and nonverbal thinking into their expressions of musical understanding. The ability to digitally create and edit clips that demonstrate, not just describe, takes thinking in sound into an arena still dependent upon but not limited by language. Through the free and open source audio recording and editing software, Audacity®, the articulation of musical thinking and musical decision-making is afforded with music that the students themselves generate. Thinking-in-music-with-music in this way offers listening based general education experiences in MUS 339 a similar kind of creative artistic decision making as used when the online songwriters in MUS 225 are working with their expressions of original musical ideas and digital capture of these decisions. Because the ability to edit student-generated musical clips is not dependent upon a performance experience base, students who would otherwise be excluded from creative musical expressions in a general education setting are now able to function as creative musical decision-makers.

11:00-11:50
eCreativity Toward Critical Media Consumers
Jody Gaber, Lawrence Technological University and Marija Franetovic, Lawrence Technological University
The new learner is inundated as never before with various forms and sources of mass media. One reason for this is that we live in an age where anyone with internet connectivity has access to free technology tools with a learning curve that is not too steep. Also, the internet has been an open medium, which is only recently being threatened by new regulation policies. Though new learners may be socially media savvy, higher education should embrace guiding them to become critical consumers of media, especially for their discipline.  A Media, Communication and Society course was ideally suited to extend classroom instruction to include technologies which support student creativity. Creativity is a necessary part of becoming a critical consumer of media. With creative projects, students critically analyzed media and then synthesized disparate components to retell a story on their own terms. Students worked on three projects using a social media tool (Twitter) to critically analyze media regulations, video (EyeJot) to interpret media ideology, and animation (xtranormal) to critique media globalization. This presentation will explain the projects, the rubrics, showcase unique student work, and share strategies which were used to encourage creativity.

Presentation File (.pptx)


2:00-2:50
Anyone Can Do It! Developing Musical Skills in Non-Musicians Through the Use of Web-Based Applications
Jenine Brown, Oakland University
This presentation discusses some of the web-based tools that can assist non-musicians in learning about music. I teach non-musicians about music in online classes at Oakland University. In these classes, I ask students to not
only learn about basic musical concepts, but to go one step further and demonstrate their knowledge by composing their own music. These projects help students learn practical applications of the elements of music that are introduced in my classes, and students deepen their understanding of the various dimensions of music through this hands-on approach to learning about the basic musical elements. Composing music can be a daunting task, even for trained musicians. However, this presentation suggests that through creative use of some web-based applications, anyone (even non-musicians) can compose music. Three composition projects will be shared in the presentation. As an example: one project asks students to learn to write a drumbeat to accompany a given vocal track. To compose the projects, students use free websites that aid in music creation such as www.aviary.com, www.ccMixter.org, and www.noteflight.com. Throughout my presentation, I consider some of the questions of this pedagogical approach.

Presentation File (.pptx)


3:00-3:50
Utilizing Motion Pictures to Optimize Flipped Class Student Learning
Chris Kobus, Oakland University
Student comprehension and retention of difficult material has been a challenge going back to the founding of the Academy. There is a recognized need for going beyond the classroom today with both the challenge of decreasing average student performance (especially in STEM fields) and the advent of technological tools available to instructors. To that end, I will discuss the advantages of a flipped class to a traditional setting, why online or partly online education is heralding in an educational revolution, and the engagement of different areas of students’ brains to stimulate comprehension. In particular, involving the part of the brain that is engaged in pleasure, such as watching a part of an interesting motion picture, and centering lectures, homework and projects around movie clips can increase the engagement of students to what might otherwise be ‘boring’ material (at least to students). Examples of how this can be done in both a lecture format and a student-centered format will be presented and discussed. Issues such as copyright infringement, what we as instructors can and cannot do, will also be covered.


Technology that Enables Creativity II (Grape)
9:00-9:50
Empowering Students to Drive Their Own Learning Through Using Interactive Online Guides
Breanna Hamm, University of Michigan and Alissa Talley-Pixley, University of Michigan
Students who visit our technology facilities at the University of Michigan Library learn to create their own materials from the driver’s seat, enabling them to learn in ways that are more relevant and engaging. Whether it is creating a blog, website, video, or poster, we model this philosophy through our one-on-one instructional sessions and workshops. Traditionally, we provided print documentation, but through a series of focus groups and usability tests of faculty and students (both undergraduate and graduate), we now have a better understanding that our users want a more interactive experience. With this understanding, we have transformed our print handouts into dynamic
online research guides that allow students to learn in a way that best suits their needs. This personalized experience helps them complete their work independently and productively. This presentation will discuss how we facilitate creative learning by students and will include a demonstration of the interactive online resource guides we have created.

Presentation File (.pptx)


10:00-10:50
Leveraging Emerging Technologies to Increase the Perception of Instructor Presence & Meaningful Feedback
David Goodrich, Michigan State University and Richard Harris, Southeastern University
Online learning is on the increase and shows no signs of slowing down. As universities endeavor to put their courses online, many run into problems when it comes to courses that require presentations such as the basic public speaking course which is often required of all students at an institution. Questions of how faculty and administrators should consider offering presentation-based courses online will be addressed as well as the new options that arise for meaningful and timely feedback for learners as a result of emerging technology integration. Technological issues and best practices are discussed in this presentation. The purpose of this portfolio project is to create a practical guide that can be used by faculty and administration in answering the many questions of how and why to teach courses in an online format that involve presentations from both students and faculty.

11:00-11:50
Building a Technology Toolkit
Laura Gabrion, Oakland University
It has become abundantly clear that students are using “multimedia and hypertext tools […] graphics and animation[…] camcorders, video editors, animators” (Semali, 2003) and more to enhance or even supplant their classroom assignments. Guiding students to effectively communicate through the interaction of different modes (Duncum, 2004) involves offering them opportunities to explore fundamental strategies through new means. Participants will examine various technological tools for use in their own classrooms as well as glean the importance of providing students multiple ways to express meaning.

Presentation File (.ppt)


2:00-2:50
OpenSim for Sychronous Virtual Class Activities
William Solomonson, Oakland University
Many educators have been fascinated by the learning opportunities offered by multi-user virtual worlds (MUVEs) like SecondLife. However, many have found problems in dealing in private platforms, such as modified cost structures, steep student learning curves, difficulty in controlling the learning environment, and others. OpenSim is an open-source simulator that fulfills much of the original promise of MUVEs for education. Using multi-media learning theory and current research as a framework, one professor has run OpenSim for synchronous virtual guided discussions with graduate students. The existence of social cues and social presence in OpenSim increases active cognitive processing in students and allows them engage in intellectually challenging and creative virtual class sessions. OpenSim is open-source software that allows individuals to run their own simulators and servers to have complete control of a MUVE – a significant difference from existing private platforms. In this session, the cognitive psychology theoretical basis for utilizing MUVEs will be discussed, advantages of OpenSim will be described, technical requirements for setting up OpenSim will be reviewed, and a live demonstration showing OpenSim will be conducted. A limited number of attendees with laptops will be able to quickly install an open-source viewer program and enter the OpenSim as an avatar.

3:00-3:50
A Model for Creative Solutions: An Open Online Course
Gwyn Shelle, Michigan State University and Amanda Bodle, Michigan State University
In 2050, a projected 9.3 billion people will be on the planet, and 70% of them will live in mega-cities. A massively open online course (MOOC), offered by Michigan State University, was created to share ideas on meeting the needs of this growing population – without draining water, energy and natural resources.The online course uses technology in innovative ways and takes a learner-centered approach. The course is completely free and open to students, faculty, or anyone with an interest in this topic. The course site was built in WordPress and includes a weekly webcast by an international expert, interactive discussion forums, videos, a free e-book, news and academic articles. The content of the course is openly licensed under creative commons. MOOCs are becoming increasingly popular ways of sharing content with much larger and more diverse audiences. Participants are able to set their own level of engagement. A certificate of completion is offered to those who meet certain criteria and future plans include offering university credit through a special topics course. Our presentation will outline the steps taken to create this online experience. It will include stories of successes and challenges relating to the technology and teaching aspects of the course.

Presentation File (.pptx)


Creativity with the iPad (Apple)
9:00-9:50
iPads to the Rescue
Elena Qureshi, Madonna University and Phillip Olla, Madonna University
The first iPad arrived in U.S. stores and found its way into higher education and K-12 on April 3, 2012. It was promised to become a new tool to stimulate the process of teaching and learning and student creativity in the classroom. The presenters of this proposal are early adopters of this exciting technology with their university students. In this presentation, they will share their experiences – the good, the not so good and… the unexpected - of using iPads with their undergraduate and graduate students and lessons learned. iPads were effectively used in Health Care Informatics Courses and Instructional Design (education major) courses for over a year. The main focus of using this technology in the classroom was (1) to increase real time collaboration, (2) content sharing between devices and a projector, (3) teaching with apps, (4) using games in early childhood. The presenters will share a list of creative iPad applications to engage students and promote effective teaching and learning in the classroom.

10:00-10:50
Academic App Survival Kit: Creative Mobile Composition with the iPad
Christina Fontana, Oakland University
As a writing and rhetoric instructor who teaches students how to use research and composition tools, I want to teach them to translate their research skills to any area of study and compose creative research projects. As a group project in my Comp II (WRT 160) course, I will pilot a “deserted island” research tools assignment: If you had to research, draft, and compose a project using only apps on a mobile device (not an internet browser), what
apps would you choose? Students will have a budget and app limit. Mobile apps allow students to focus on specific tools of research rather than the vast sea of the World Wide Web. The app-tool analogy shows their step-by-step
understanding of the composition process rather than their ability to type topic terms in a search bar. I will also elicit other Writing and Rhetoric instructors’ “desert island” apps, specifically consulting our iPad study group since they are considering how they would implement iPads in the composition classroom. Through these findings we will collaborate to make one app package. Since our department goal is to offer iPad carts for classwork, we could propose loading this app package to these iPads.

11:00-11:50
How to Use iAuthor to Create iPad Compatible Interactive eBooks for Class
David Rodenbaugh, Oakland University
Many students are increasingly reliant upon digital materials such as web-based textbooks they access via personal mobile devices. There are limitations with the use of content provided by publishers such as a lack of interactivity or the ability to add notes. In addition, the materials are not customizable by the instructor to best fit a specific course. A free app provided by Apple, iAuthor, allows faculty to create engaging customized iBooks that can include text, graphics, videos, interactive figures, presentations, and quizzes.  Importantly, the student can use the touch interface to highlight and/or add notes that can be transformed into flash cards.  This presentation will demonstrate the use of various features of iAuthor for creating iBooks for the iPad.

2:00-2:50
Teaching with Mobile Technology: iPads, Smart Phones, and Similar Devices
Marshall Kitchens, Oakland University and Aaron Bird, Oakland University
The effectiveness of mobile technology in the higher education classroom, especially the use of iPads as a tool of both learning and creative expression, has yet to be thoroughly explored. Early studies have suggested that institutions should begin by piloting the iPad in a strategic and tested way by beginning with a small group of enthused instructors willing to explore the use of the technology in their own classrooms across a variety of disciplines. This presentation explores the potential for mobile technologies (iPads in particular) in college learning environments. We will present a number of the findings from our Faculty Learning Community on Mobile Technology in the classroom and seek feedback from audience members’ concerning data gathering instruments and indices for a more widely distributed survey of faculty habits and interests with mobile technology.

Presentation File (.pptx)


3:00-3:50
iPads in the Music Classroom
Deborah Blair, Oakland University
iPad use is changing the ways we engage in the musical processes of performing, creating and listening to music. As a music teacher educator, I will share the ways I am exploring the use of iPads for the music classroom, the classroom for learners with autism, and the teacher education classroom.

Presentation File (.pptx)